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June 27, 2020 2 min read

Before you dive in, this post is best read while listening to DJ MACAU's Love Is Project PRIDE playlist. ❤

Rainbow flag

Harvey Milk asked Gilbert Baker to design a unifying symbol for the gay community, and what did they come up with it? You got it—a rainbow flag! The rainbow flag as a pride month symboldebuted at the San Francisco Pride Parade in 1978. (via ShareMyLesson.com)

Psssst: If rainbow is your thing, like it is ours, SHOP OUR RAINBOW LOVE BRACELET to support the "It Gets Better Project," a non-profit empowering LGBTQ youth around the globe.

Pride parades weren’t always called Pride parades. When early Pride events started, they were more militant, and were more often referred to as marches. “Gay Liberation” or “Gay Freedom” were more common names for those marches. (via Pride.com)

June was chosen to be the LGBT Pride Month to commemorate the Stonewall riots, which took place in New York in June 1969, when gay bars were illegal. The brave activism displayed in the incident is considered the start of the gay liberation movement.(via ThailandTatler.com)

LGBTQ Texans are getting back to Pride’s protest roots while standing alongside Black and brown people in their community, who are still fighting for equality on two fronts. (TexasTribune.com, June 26, 2020)

This PRIDE, we want to specifically highlight the QTPOC (Queer and Trans People of Color) community. Similar to police brutality, this community is among the people most likely to experience violence. According to the AVP, "trans people are seven times more likely to experience police violence, and transgender women were 1.8 times more likely to experience sexual violence when compared with other survivors." 

Let's rally around this community, advocate for their rights, and support them in any way we can. Here are a few QTPOC organizations you can support this PRIDE-packed month and more importantly, beyond the month of June:

  • Audre Lorde Project is a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two Spirit, Trans and Gender Non Conforming People of Color center for community organizing, focusing on the New York City area.
  • Black Aids Institute  is a uniquely and unapologetically Black think and do tank in America powered by two decades of work to end the Black HIV epidemic 
  • Marsha P. Johnson Institute protects and defends the human rights of black transgender people. 

The work is never done. Let’s keep going. 

XOXO, 

Chrissie
Founder, Love is Project

P.S. 
Remember to best a move to 
DJ MACAU’s Love Is Project PRIDE playlist. ❤


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